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Gen. 50

07 Oct

8/3/10 Joseph had his father embalmed after the manner of the Egyptians, a procedure that took 40 days. By now the famine was long over but Pharaoh continued to employ Joseph in apparently an important position in Egypt. Since Joseph was so prominent all Egypt observed 70 days of mourning for his father.

At that point Joseph asked Pharaoh’s permission to take some time off and bury his father in Machpelah, which not only did Pharaoh allow but he sent a sizable delegation along with Joseph including the elders of his own household and of all Egypt and the household of Joseph, his brothers, and his father. It was a large contingency that made its way back to Canaan. After crossing the Jordan the group observed seven days of mourning, which was noted by the Canaanites as something amazing and unique.

Joseph returned to Egypt. He was still a young man at this point, around 40 years old probably. His brothers feared that maybe Joseph held a grudge against them but was waiting for the passing of Jacob to act. So they brought him a planned message asking for his mercy. Joseph, though, had been genuine in his forgiveness. He wept over the fact that they mistrusted him so. “You meant evil against me, but God meant it for good…” he told them. Joseph refused to judge his brothers over what had happened. And not only did he refuse to judge, he promised to care for them for the rest of their lives.

Joseph lived for another 70 years in Egypt presumably in Pharaoh’s service. When he died at 110 he asked his brothers who at least some of them were still living to take his bones from there when Israel left. This, of course, his brothers would not do in person, but they passed the message down faithfully from generation to generation to the time of the exodus. Then indeed they took Joseph’s bones with them.

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Posted by on October 7, 2013 in Uncategorized

 

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