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Gen. 50

8/3/10 Joseph had his father embalmed after the manner of the Egyptians, a procedure that took 40 days. By now the famine was long over but Pharaoh continued to employ Joseph in apparently an important position in Egypt. Since Joseph was so prominent all Egypt observed 70 days of mourning for his father.

At that point Joseph asked Pharaoh’s permission to take some time off and bury his father in Machpelah, which not only did Pharaoh allow but he sent a sizable delegation along with Joseph including the elders of his own household and of all Egypt and the household of Joseph, his brothers, and his father. It was a large contingency that made its way back to Canaan. After crossing the Jordan the group observed seven days of mourning, which was noted by the Canaanites as something amazing and unique.

Joseph returned to Egypt. He was still a young man at this point, around 40 years old probably. His brothers feared that maybe Joseph held a grudge against them but was waiting for the passing of Jacob to act. So they brought him a planned message asking for his mercy. Joseph, though, had been genuine in his forgiveness. He wept over the fact that they mistrusted him so. “You meant evil against me, but God meant it for good…” he told them. Joseph refused to judge his brothers over what had happened. And not only did he refuse to judge, he promised to care for them for the rest of their lives.

Joseph lived for another 70 years in Egypt presumably in Pharaoh’s service. When he died at 110 he asked his brothers who at least some of them were still living to take his bones from there when Israel left. This, of course, his brothers would not do in person, but they passed the message down faithfully from generation to generation to the time of the exodus. Then indeed they took Joseph’s bones with them.

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Posted by on October 7, 2013 in Uncategorized

 

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Gen. 49:19-33

8/2/10 Gad: In 1 Chr. 5 & 12 the Gadites were always brave to fight, a valiant tribe. The chronicles of Israel don’t tell about Gad being often attacked but they clearly were always ready to help protect from any attack upon Israel.

Asher: Asher was promised rich food and the tribe did receive the most fertile area around Carmel by the Mediterranean. Solomon supplied Hiram with olive oil from this region. This would have included Lebanon, still known as the breadbasket of the Middle East.

Naphtali: We don’t know much about what happened with this tribe. Perhaps the prophecy about a doe and beautiful words refers to a gentle people who wouldn’t have made the “news” of the OT as the more in-your-face tribes. Not that they never fought. In 1 Kg 5 they fought with Barak against King Jabin. These short prophecies were sons of his concubines.

Joseph: Jacob overflowed in his blessing on Joseph for a number of reasons. One was because of the suffering he had undergone by his brothers and in Egypt. Another was because of his virtue and faithfulness throughout. He is a type of the shepherd Jesus.

Benjamin: The tribe of Benjamin became a warlike tribe, excellent archers and slingers. They were often at the forefront of battle. Ehud and Saul were of this tribe.

The account goes on to say that Jacob blessed all of his sons with a blessing appropriate to him. Then he asked that he be buried in Machpelah with Abraham and Isaac, then he lay down and died.

 
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